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  • gilwilson 2:19 PM on June 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: l. ron hubbard, ,   

    “Battlefield Earth” By L. Ron Hubbard 

    11687180Battlefield Earth
    By: L. Ron Hubbard
    Full Cast Production
    Length: 47 hrs and 32 mins
    Release date: 06-06-16
    Publisher: Galaxy Audio

    We all know that books have the possibility to sweep us off to other worlds. In this case that other world is Earth in the year 3000.  Humans are slaves to the invading race of the Psychlos.  To the Psychlos the Earth is poisonous, however, minerals, especially gold, makes the planet necessary.  The Psychlos are strip-mining Earth and the humans are the slave labor to get the work done.  L. Ron Hubbard wrote some great science-fiction and this epic novel is one of the best.

    Now take that same book and make it a full length audio drama and you have got the perfect escape. With great voice actors that create the characters to go along with the original music and sound effects. Listening to this already thrilling story of Earth’s conquest by an alien race and the battle to take it back, comes to full dimensional audio life. The listener will be placed in the middle of the action with this full on production.

    Publisher’s Summary
    Winner, 2017 APA Audie Awards – Excellence in Marketing

    Earphones Award Winner

    Best of 2016 Science Fiction Audiobook

    In the year AD 3000, Earth is a barren wasteland, plundered of its natural resources by the millennium-long regime of taloned, gas-breathing, nine-foot alien conquerors from the planet Psychlo. Fewer than 35,000 humans survive in a handful of communities scattered across the face of a postapocalyptic Earth.

    From a desolate village in the Rocky Mountains near what once was Denver, Colorado, a courageous young man named Jonnie Goodboy Tyler embarks on a hero’s journey to challenge the fearful myths of his people.

    Enslaved by the sadistic Terl, the Psychlo security chief of Earth, Jonnie and a small band of survivors pit their quest for freedom against Terl’s ruthless ambition for personal wealth and power in a rebellion that erupts across the continents of Earth and the cosmic sprawl of the Psychlo empire, with the fate of the world, of mankind, and of the galaxies beyond in the balance.

    Superlative quality – a new standard for all audiobooks.

    Unlike any other audiobook ever produced. A fully immersive experience, this unabridged audiobook features more than 65 actors including Grammy Award-winning audiobook producer and narrator Stefan Rudnicki.

    This state-of-the-art audio engineering has created a wholly cinematic soundtrack with:

    47½ hours of pulse-pounding drama and action professionally recorded with high-definition sound.
    A gorgeous cinematic soundtrack with full orchestral compositions and more than 150,000 sound effects.
    A cast of more than 65 actors – many of whom are celebrity voices from TV, films, and games – performing 198 characters.
    Written with a phenomenal burst of creative energy in a sustained eight-month period in 1980, and first published in October 1982, Battlefield Earth became a breakaway New York Times and international best seller, hailed as one of the classic science fiction novels.

    ©2016 Galaxy Audio (P)2016 Galaxy Audio

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  • gilwilson 5:56 PM on March 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
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    Loot of the Shanung By: L. Ron Hubbard 

    19084267Loot of the Shanung
    By: L. Ron Hubbard
    Narrated by: R. F. Daley, Jim Meskimen, Robert Wu, Christina Huntington, Tadao Tomomatsu
    Length: 1 hr and 54 mins
    Release date: 08-12-14
    Publisher: Galaxy Audio

    Once again it’s time for some fun from
    the Golden Age of Stories. It’s another pulp fiction story from L.Ron Hubbard, who I think was the king of the pulps, he at least was one of the busiest. This time we have the story “Loot of the Shanung,” which was originally published in 1936 in “Smashing Novels” pulp magazine. Here we have an American reporter in China, and the heiress daughter of a missing American oil magnate, combining forces to find her father.

    Hubbard wrote several stories that take place in the mysterious “Far East.” Asian countries prettsmashing_novels_193605y much were the thing of mystery, imagination and mysticism to us in the Western Hemisphere. Hubbard was well experienced in that portion of the world having spent a few years there. His stories that take place there always relay the social, economic, and political struggles of the area. These super action stories always featured a hero who was there to save a damsel in distress. Hey it was the ’30s, misogyny was a way of life.

    Billionaire George Harley Rockham appears to have been abducted from the Shanung, a coastal steamer, when that ship comes up missing. Rockham has his hands in oil throughout China, and if he doesn’t show within four days his stock will fall, and his oil rights will be up for the taking. Jimmy Vance, a reporter who goes after any story till it’s been solved, has been working on the story since the ship went missing. Rockham’s daughter walks in his office offering a big reward if Vance will find her father. Vance refuses the award, but smells a good story and joined the girl in her search. She’s abducted by crooks, but Vance turns the table on them, then they had for Kowloon, an island near Hong Kong, where he suspects pirates may have boarded the Shanung. The hero being a writer is a common occurrence in Hubbard’s adventure stories. Write what you best know about.

    Pirates, Gangsters and Military all create an adventurous atmosphere that will allow you to get lost in a pulp fiction story. The best part is if you were to get the audiobook version, like I did, you get a full production. Galaxy Audio puts these together as if they were old fashioned radio dramas. The actors all create fun, believable character that are worth rooting for or hating.

    Publisher’s Summary

    Stop the presses! One hundred thousand dollar reward offered for the return of George Harley Rockham! That’s more than enough to turn Shanghai newspaperman Jimmy Vance’s head. Throw in the gorgeous dame who’s offering the reward – Rockham’s daughter Virginia – and he might lose his head altogether. As fast-talking as Jimmy Stewart in The Philadelphia Story, Vance jumps at the chance…the money…and the girl. But as Jimmy quickly discovers, there are several billion reasons to watch his back. Because that’s how much Rockham is worth, and there are some very hard cases out there willing to kill to separate the old man from his money. Next thing Jimmy knows, Virginia’s tied to a chair, and he’s got a couple of guns pointed at his head. But it’ll take more than a little rope and a couple of firearms to keep this reporter down. The truth is tied to the mysterious fate of a steamship named Shanung – and what Jimmy finds could be the biggest story of his life…if he lives to tell it.

    In the issue of Smashing Novels where this story first appeared the editor wrote: “‘Loot of the Shanung’ is a soul-stirring tale of the China Sea, a story of modern piracy set in the Far East. L. Ron Hubbard wrote it. He knows China. He has been there. He traveled through the country and met the people and observed their customs. Smashing Novels will have other stories from him – stories of far-off places and little known people. He knows of what he writes.”

    ©2014 Galaxy Audio (P)2014 Galaxy Audio

     
  • gilwilson 5:57 PM on March 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , l. ron hubbard,   

    The Green God (Stories from the Golden Age)By: L. Ron Hubbard 

    The Green God (Stories from the Golden Age)19084269By: L. Ron Hubbard
    Narrated by: Christina Huntington, R. F. Daley, Michael Yurchak, Jim Meskimen
    Length: 2 hrs and 1 min
    Release date: 08-12-14
    Publisher: Galaxy Audio

    I nearly forgot what it was like to listen to one of these Galaxy Audio productions of the pulp fiction stories by L. Ron Hubbard. Galaxy Audio’s productions are pure theatre of the mind. With some of the greatest voice actors, original music and sound effects these audio productions will put you right in the middle of the action and in this book dodging bullets.

    This release has the main story, “The Green God,” and a bonus story, “Five Mex for a Million.” Both of these are about Americans in China, during the 1930’s. And both of these protagonists know how to get into trouble and with wit and action hero attitude know how to get out of it. Yeah sure there’s a little sexism, but those were the days of the Damsel in Distress.

    “The Green God”8466033
    Bill Mahone, a Naval Intelligence officer in China, has undertaken a dangerous mission. To stop the looting, rioting, and death that wracks the port of Tientsin, he must go undercover into the Chinese underworld to recover the priceless Green God whose theft from a local temple triggered the riots. Standing in his way: thieves, corrupt Army officers, a mob of rioting fanatics wielding long knives, and numerous other near-death experiences.

    “Five Mex for a Million”
    Captain Royal F. Sterling stands falsely accused of murder. It’s not that he didn’t kill a man, but he did so in self-defense, though he’s facing the
    firing squad if caught. Looking for clothes to disguise himself
    at the Thieves’ Market, he instead is attracted to a large, locked chest, with an inscription offering him long life and happiness. Compelled by its secret, he finds inside the beautiful daughter of a powerful White Russian general who owns a profitable chunk of Upper Mongolia dragging him into a web of conspiracy and renegade Chinese officers.

     

    In the days of the pulps different magazines covered different genres and Hubbard wrote for many of them. “The Green God”story was originally published in the Thrilling Adventures, Vol. 8, No. 3, Feb. 1934. While “Five Mex for a Million” was originally published in Top-Notch, Vol. 97, No. 5, Nov. 1935. Hubbard’s pulp writings may have been his most productive writings. He wrote so many stories for so many pulp

    Top-Notch-Pulp-Magazine-Nov-1935-L-Ron

    magazines. I am so happy that Galaxy Audio is republishing these stories. The audio versions are full cast productions that sound a lot like old time radio, and the print versions are printed on a simulated pulp paper and in pulp magazine size. Hubbard’s pulp writings are always fast-paced and dynamic.

     

     

    Publisher’s Summary

    Private detective Sam Spade nearly died, several times over, chasing The Maltese Falcon. But what Spade faced in pursuit of the black bird was child’s play compared to what Lieutenant Bill Mahone of Naval Intelligence endures when he sets out to find The Green God. He’s tortured with knives, threatened with a slow, painful death, and buried alive. And then things get really nasty. The entire Chinese city of Tientsin is under siege from within – the streets filled with rioting, arson, mass looting, and murder. And all because the city’s sacred idol, The Green God, has gone missing. Mahone’s convinced he knows who stole the deity of jade, diamonds, and pearls. To retrieve it, though, he’ll have to go undercover and underground. But he’s walking a razor’s edge – between worship and warfare, between a touch of heaven and a taste of bloody hell.

    As a young man, Hubbard visited Manchuria, where his closest friend headed up British intelligence in northern China. Hubbard gained a unique insight into the intelligence operations and spy-craft in the region, as well as the criminal trade in sacred objects. It was on this experience that he based “The Green God”, which was his first professional sale, published in February, 1934 – the beginning of a very remarkable and prolific writing career. Also includes the adventure “Five Mex for a Million”, in which an American Army captain, falsely accused of murder, finds himself taking on the Chinese government, a powerful Russian general, and a mysterious, unexpected passenger.

    ©2014 Galaxy Audio (P)2014 Galaxy Audio

     
  • gilwilson 4:11 PM on November 6, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , far flung andventure, , , l. ron hubbard, , oil drilling, venezuela   

    Audiobook Review: “Black Towers to Danger” By L. Ron Hubbard 

    blacktowers

    Audiobook Review: “Black Towers to Danger”

    By L. Ron Hubbard

    Multi-cast performance

    Produced by Galaxy Audio

    Approx. 2 hours.

     

    It never ceases to amaze me, the number of genres covered by L. Ron Hubbard during his writing heyday of the mid-20th century pulp fiction days.  During that time period the pulps were a regular source of entertainment since there was no internet and very little television, if any.  Escapism fiction was pretty much needed with the height of the Depression during the peak of the pulps’ popularity.

     

    Hubbard wrote in the typical genres;  Westerns, Sea Adventures, Air Adventures, and the genre that got me hooked on Hubbard, Science-Fiction.  Some of his stories nearly made up their own genre.   This story, “Black Towers to Danger,” is one that could have been its own genre, oil exploration.  Hubbard wrote a couple of stories that could fit into this genre and pretty much could have created his own pulp magazine book. 

     

    In the days of the pulps different magazines covered different genres and Hubbard wrote for many of them.  This story was originally published in the October, 1936 issue of “Five Novels Monthly.”  “Five Novels Monthly” magazine had its run from 1928 up until World War II and a paper shortage caused the magazine to publish quarterly until the last issue was published in 1948.  The main focus of this magazine was to tell a story as a whole.  Sometimes the pulps would run longer stories in parts so that the readers would be sure to buy the next issue.  “Five Novels” strove to make sure the readers got full stories every issue.

     

    “Black Towers to Danger” is an oil drilling adventure where Bill Murphy has 30 days to bring a claim of an oil strike in Venezuela.   But as with all Hubbard stories it is never that easy and there’s a dame involved.  The dame happens to be the daughter of a rival driller who is set to take over Murphy’s wells if he doesn’t turn in that claim.   The rival is found dead and the woman, who Murphy happens to be in love with, thinks Murphy killed her father.  The truth is darker and more sinister and revolves around greed. Murphy encounters murder, a vengeful woman, and the destruction of his rig before he uncovers the truth and leads the listener/reader on thrilling adventure.

     

    Once again the listener’s adventure is brought to life with the excellent full production from Galaxy Audio.  Excellent voice actors, sound effects and perfect original mood music make this story come to life and puts the listener in the middle of the action.  Two hours of your life will move by so fast that you may find yourself wanting to go out and start drilling for oil in your own backyard.

     
  • gilwilson 8:24 PM on September 23, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: air adventures, far flung adventures, , , , l. ron hubbard, , ,   

    Audiobook Review: “The Lieutenant Takes the Sky” by L. Ron Hubbard 

    lieutenant

    Audiobook Review: “The Lieutenant Takes the Sky”

    by L. Ron Hubbard

    Multi-Cast Performance

    Produced by GalaxyAudio

    Approx 2 hours

     

    I think if I had all of these re-publishing of L. Ron Hubbard’s classic tales from the Pulp-fiction magazine days at one time I would listen to them all in a row. Thankfully GalaxyAudio / GalaxyPress are releasing them one month at a time. I say thankfully because then I would get them all done and would run out too soon. There are still a few releases to come, and I will keep listening as they are released, no matter what the genre of story, because of just how great these stories turn out when run through the magic behind Galaxy Audio.

     

    I have to clarify this a little. The stories by themselves are fun stories featuring over the top characters and exciting adventures. They were written during a time when authors, especially L. Ron Hubbard were getting paid by the word to be printed in many different magazines in many different genres. So the authors had to write great stories in order to succeed and survive. Hubbard wrote in pretty much every genre, and while some of these stories could have been lost, GalaxyPress has been reprinting the stories in a format that looks and feels like the old pulps, but are a bit sturdier. Even better GalaxyAudio takes these stories and brings them to full 3D life.

     

    GalaxyAudio produces the book using top of the line voice actors acting out the various parts and bringing the over the top characters to life. The actors are able to portray the characters by vocally in a way that not only brings out the full psyche of the characters, but is able to push the action along and keep the listener glued to audiobook. With sound effects and original music to wrap up this aural package, these audiobooks from GalaxyAudio are a must have for anyone and everyone.

     

    This story, “The Lieutenant Takes the Sky,” is a blend air adventures and far flung adventures categories of Hubbard’s writings and was originally published in the October, 1938 issue of “Five Novels Monthly.” The story weaves in humor, adventure and the twists and turns that only L. Ron Hubbard could weave into a short story or novella.

     

    Mike Malloy has joined the French Foreign Legion and is everything but a model Legionnaire. After being thrown into the brig for “mopping the floor” with two French officers and getting ready for the long haul (five years in a Moroccan penal battalion, which is pretty much a death sentence). Malloy may get a reprieve, but it comes with a price. All he has to do is fly two historians into the desert to find a book that is the stuff of legends and hasn’t been seen for over 800 years. Oh, and his flight takes him right into the middle of a Berber rebellion.

     

    In an adventure that is the equivalent of any Indiana Jones story, this release from GalaxyAudio will keep you ducking bullets and hoping you have a parachute until the very end. Two hours of excitement that will leave you wanting more.

     
  • gilwilson 3:39 PM on May 29, 2013 Permalink | Reply
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    Audiobook Review: “The Red Dragon” By L. Ron Hubbard 

    reddragon

    “The Red Dragon”

    By L. Ron Hubbard

    A multi-cast performance

    Produced by GalaxyAudio

    Approx 2 hours

     

    With the exception of a few stories here and there I have nearly listened to all of GalaxyAudio’s productions of stories from the master story-teller, L. Ron Hubbard, up to those released until the end of this year.  There are a couple I have missed but don’t worry I will be getting those soon, one way or another.  The have almost become an addiction.

     

    The reason I love hearing these audiobooks is the superb production quality that goes into these books.  The voice actors used in each book are all top caliber and are able to bring to life the over the top characters created by Hubbard, from the lowly sidekick to the larger than life hero.  Each actor creates a full characterization in his/her vocal performance that paints a mental picture of each character that brings back the cover pictures from the old pulp fiction magazines where these stories were originally published.

     

    Add to the perfect vocal performances the subtle yet effective sound effects.  In each story the sound effects are subtle enough to not distract from the story, yet so perfectly produced that, as the listener, you will be dodging bullets, flying in old-timey aircraft with wind whipping your scarf, or dusting off dirt from the trails.    Then the addition of an original musical score that keeps the listener in the mood of each adventure.  All these tie in together to create a two hour performance that can easily compete with any movie for some great entertainment.

     

    This time around GalaxyAudio releases, “The Red Dragon,” which was originally released in the February, 1935 issue of “Five Novels” magazine.  This time around Hubbard tells the story of Michael Stuart, a red haired officer in the Marines whose career came to a halt after a failed attempt to return the Chinese Imperial Dynasty to power in the ‘30s.  Stuart has been abandoned by his country and is unable to get out of China, so, he spends his time to help others.

     

    Stuart’s latest adventure brings him to help a young woman who is on the search for a mysterious black chest hidden by her father before his murder.  Drawing on his many life’s adventures, Hubbard brings the hero and the woman all across the scenic countryside of China, including The Great Wall, to caves in Manchuria where the black chest must be recovered before it falls into the wrong hands.

     

    Two hours of pure excitement and adventure make this audiobook one two hear while doing house work or working on a major project; as long as you don’t stop working to listen solely to the performance you will find yourself working faster trying to keep pace with the hero.

     
  • gilwilson 10:40 PM on April 22, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , l. ron hubbard, , , , , soldiers, , war stories   

    Audiobook Review: “Trick Soldier” by L. Ron Hubbard 

    tricksoldier

    “Trick Soldier”
    by L. Ron Hubbard
    Multi-cast performance
    Produced by Galaxy Audio
    Approx. 2 hours

    Once again I find myself looking for a good audiobook to keep me company. I don’t want anything too heavy. I want something fun and only looking for two hours worth of entertainment. Where do I turn? To Galaxy Audio and their out of this world audio productions of L. Ron Hubbard’s “Stories from the Golden Age.”

    The “Golden Age” of stories in America I’m referring to is a time when the pulp magazines were printed in order to bring entertainment to the masses in the form of short stories. These stories covered everything from war stories, Westerns, mysteries and science-fiction. L. Ron Hubbard wrote prolifically during this time period and had many stories printed in many magazines, covering all the genres.

    Hubbard could write all these dozens of stories and still make each and everyone different. Hubbard’s stories all contained twists and turns in the plot and action that the ending was not always what you’d expect. There were some formulaic points in the stories one could expect; the hero always won, the male lead always got the dame, and crime doesn’t pay. These are pretty much to be expected norms in all of Hubbard’s writings during this time. While these could be expected as the end, Hubbard always made the journey so full of twists and turns that the adventure was always in the storytelling and not the end.

    Galaxy Press has been re-releasing these stories in their own pulp magazine type of books since 2008, and it seems they never run out of stories. The physical books are very reminiscent of the original pulp magazines and even use the original artwork from the covers of the magazines from that era. The paper stock in the books is thicker, and the artwork within the covers of the book all reflects the pulp fiction classics.

    To make things even more fun, the audiobook versions of these releases are produced by Galaxy Audio and are beyond entertaining. The audiobooks all feature multi-cast performances from a slew of actors whose talent is immeasurable and are able to bring to life all the over-the-top characters created by Hubbard. The audio performances also feature great music that pushes the story along in the chapter breaks and the sound effects are so real that you will be ducking bullets in the western stories, strapping in for launch in the science-fiction tales, and donning your life vest in the sea adventures.

    Some of the productions are single stories, but some are a special treat and contain multiple stories. This audiobook is one of those special treats and contains three thrilling far-flung adventures featuring soldiers with hidden talents and courage.

    The first story is the title story, “Trick Soldier,” which was originally published in the January, 1936 issue of “Top Notch.” The story is an odd pairing of a boot camp bully and his victim. The “Trick Soldier” is in charge of a local native army squad in Haiti. A “trick soldier” is a term used to refer to a boot camp soldier who seems to be able to excel on drill and routine yet be short on courage. The recruit who has physically bullied the “trick soldier” trudges through the jungle to serve under the “trick soldier,” 10 years later. The “trick solder” soon finds a mutiny among his troops and his bully (the second in command now) fears for his life. The tables are turned in this battle adventure with a surprising finish to a thrilling story.

    The second story, “He Walked to War,” was originally published in the October, 1935 issue of “Adventure.” This story was a nice comedic story that hit near and dear to my heart. I was once commended by a boss saying that at first he thought I was lazy, but soon realized I was a genius in that I am always trying to find ways to make my job easier to perform with as little exertion as possible. Basically, I just want to make life as easy as possible. This is exactly the case for Marin Signalman, E.Z. Go. In fact, he doesn’t want to sign his entire name and just shortens it to E.Z. Go. E.Z. is tired of walking, so he requests a transfer from Marine signalman to airplane gunner. His thinking is that instead of walking into war he can fly into war and get there faster. The problem is the first aircraft he is assigned to crashes, and he finds himself walking, once again, through the Nicaraguan underbrush.

    Finally, the last story in this collection is “Machine Gun 21,000,” which was originally published in the December, 1935 issue of “Dynamic Adventures.” This one also has a story that turns the tables, but I don’t want to say too much because the twists revealed at the end make this story very unique. Blake is in charge of a foreign platoon, and while being a great military leader, he has a habit of losing things. Blake loses machine gun number 21,000, then, facing court martial, finds the man who stole it and quells a mutiny. All the time with a general breathing down his neck telling Blake how much of a loser he is. I will say this, by the end of the story Blake is one of the most strategic planners in military history.

    Three great stories from the golden age that are fun to hear whether you are a military story fan or not. If you are, the details of the stories will keep you listening, and if you are not or have never heard a military fiction you will be having fun throughout the listening of this audiobook.

     

     
  • gilwilson 9:26 PM on April 19, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , deep sea diving, , , l. ron hubbard, , , ,   

    Audiobook Review: “Twenty Fathoms Down” by L. Ron Hubbard 

    20fathoms

    “Twenty Fathoms Down”
    by L. Ron Hubbard
    Multi-cast performance
    produced by Galaxy Audio
    Approx 2 hours

    I recently came to the realization that eventually I will have read all of the “Stories from the Golden Age” written by L. Ron Hubbard since there are a finite number of these old stories written for the old pulp-fiction magazines. What will I do then? Luckily I have a year or so to go before they are all released, but still there will come a time. I’m guessing I will go back and reread or rather re-listen to my favorite genre (the one that got me addicted to these audiobooks from Galaxy Audio in the first place), science-fiction.

    It was the science-fiction genre that attracted me to these releases, but it was the excellent production and professionalism that made me want to hear every single audiobook. Galaxy Audio turns these short stories into full blown audio dramas complete with incidental music, realistic sound-effects and some of the best voice actors available. With the great voice actors, most of the books are narrated by R.F. Daley. Daley’s voice work in the narration is the perfect match for creating what could also be ol’ timey radio shows. His voice guides the listener through the story fully expressing the emotions, ambiance and action which runs through all of these stories.

    Hopefully they will begin releasing all of Hubbard’s books as well, keeping this same formula. Like I said, though, there are still more releases, at least for a year or so, so I will keep listening to these awesome adventures.

    This time around was a bit of a sea-adventure with “Twenty Fathoms Down.” This story was originally published in the September, 1934 issue of “Five Novels” and takes the listener on an undersea treasure hunting adventure full of gold, emeralds and murder.

    Deep-sea diver, Hawk Ridley, has the information on a sunken Spanish galleon with a cache of gold bullion. The problem is that a rival wants that treasure and will do anything to keep it out of Hawk’s hands, including murder. Hawk locates the wreck and discovers not only a fortune in gold but a cache of sparkling emeralds, as well.

    To make for a great mystery, Hawk and his crew discover a stowaway onboard his ship. That stowaway, a beautiful woman wearing a wedding dress, happens to be the daughter of the rival that wants to steal the gold out from under Hawk. When one of Hawk’s divers is pulled out of the water dead in his suit, the woman becomes suspect of sabotage. Then when Hawk is left for dead on a dive and his ship is torpedoed, the battle for the gold begins.

    The excellent acting and superb sound-effects will have you holding your breath while the divers struggle for life under the sea.

     
  • gilwilson 6:50 PM on March 17, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: adventures, , , , , , l. ron hubbard, ,   

    “Gun Boss of Tumbleweed” by. L. Ron Hubbard 

    gunbossoftumbleweedaudiobook

    “Gun Boss of Tumbleweed”
    by. L. Ron Hubbard
    Multi-cast performance
    Produced by Galaxy Audio
    Approx 2 hours

    What I like about books would be a list that would deserve its own blog entry, but for right now I’ll summarize what that entry would contain. Books are great for learning new skills and ideas, but the best part of books would be the entertainment. I’m a big fan of the escapism provided by books. I talk to a few people that say that the more fantastical stories the less interested they are, for me it is just the opposite. The more fantastical the more chance I have to escape and enjoy the story. I’m one of those that just absorbs the story and allows it to unfold as I progress through the reading (or listening, in the case of audiobooks).

    During the mid-20th century in the United States, the pre-cursor to comic books, Pulp magazines provided that escapism for the masses. These magazines were called pulps because of the cheap pulpy paper used in their printing. Usually selling for a dime an issue these magazines would contain thrilling stories in many genres. If you were a sci-fi fan you could get yourself a variety of stories from different magazines. If you were a fan of westerns they had you covered with many different western magazines. This time around in my diving into another group of stories by L. Ron Hubbard are from the western genre and even more specific from the same “Thrilling Westerns” magazine.

    I was never a fan of westerns until I was introduced to these stories from Hubbard, even more specifically, through the audiobooks produced by Galaxy Audio. Galaxy Audio takes these already fun stories and through the magic of audio production turn these stories into perfect escapism stories. Mixing in the music between chapters creates the perfect transition, the original music fits the mood and settings of the stories so well you almost don’t notice it, but what you do notice you are more involved with the story for. The sound effects are so spot on that at times during the gunfights you’ll be dodging bullets, and on the trail rides you’ll be dusting off the trail dust. Mix that all in with the excellent voice actors used and you’ll find your 30 minute commute seeming to be over before you know it. Or like I did a couple of times, drive the long way home so that you can get as much listening time in as possible.

    It is this high production value that makes these Hubbard westerns fantastical. The feeling that you are riding along or dodging bullets along with the heroes and villains. It is because of this that no matter what the genre, I will be anxiously waiting for any and all future releases from Galaxy Audio.

    This time around the release contains two stories. The first and title story, “Gun Boss of Tumbleweed,” was originally published in the April, 1949 issue of “Thrilling Western” magazine. This story features Mart Kincaid who is a hired gun hand for Gar Malone, except the hiring was actually done through blackmail. Gar knows a secret about Mart’s brother and in order to keep that secret Gar forces Mart to do the dirty work. The latest job is to run the true owners off the Singing Canyon spread. Mart hates Gar and hates the jobs but does them to protect his brother. This particular job is the last straw for Mart and decides it’s time to make his last stand.

    The next story, “Blood on His Spurs,” was originally published in the September, 1949 issue of “Thrilling Western” magazine. This time around a feud between two men, Bates and McLean, is put aside to save to save McLean’s son and stop a band of cattle rustlers.

    Fun western adventures with audio production that will put you right in the middle of the action.

     
  • gilwilson 1:43 PM on February 2, 2013 Permalink | Reply
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    “The Devil — With Wings” by L. Ron Hubbard 

    devil with wings

    “The Devil — With Wings”
    by L. Ron Hubbard
    Full cast production
    produced by Galaxy Audio
    Approx 2 hours

     
    Originally published in the pulp magazine, “Five Novels Monthly” in November of 1937. This story is one of the reasons that pulp fiction magazines were the father to comic books. In actuality I would relate this story to many of the heroes created in the Marvel Comics universe. Marvel Comics is responsible for many superheroes that have ordinary problems but extraordinary powers. Take Peter Parker for example, high school nerd picked on by bullies and just trying to make it through life, when he gets bitten by a radio-active spider his new super powers are great for fighting crime, but he can’t let anyone know his secret so the bullies continue to dish it out and he continues to take it. In this story we have a hero who can’t cut a break. He is feared by the Japanese as he has waged his own personal war on behalf of the Chinese.

    The setting is 1930s China and the Chinese have launched attacks against the Japanese. Many of these attacks are attributed to a British airman named, Forsyth, “The Devil with Wings.” Some of the stories my be propaganda and hype but some are true and Forsythe doesn’t do any thing to stop the rumors, if anything he propagates the propaganda by the costume he wears, the all black costume consists of, aviator hood with oval eye lenses, black gauntlets, black high boots. If you ask me, I’d say that L. Ron Hubbard created the precursor to the modern-day vigilante superhero.

    Forsythe gets the credit for raining down terror on the Japanese, but there is one credit he doesn’t want. That is the death of an American scientist. To prove his innocence he must seek the help of the scientist’s sister. If she doesn’t kill “The Devil” first he will not only prove his innocence but deliver a blow to the Japanese that will be another notch in the belt of “The Devil with Wings.”

    As is true with all of the audiobooks I’ve heard from Galaxy Audio, this one puts the listener smack dab in the middle of the action. The great sound effects and music keeps you on the edge of your seat and the superb voice work brings these over-the-top characters to life. For the most entertaining two hours in your life grab any of these Stories from the Golden Age from the master storyteller L. Ron Hubbard and Galaxy Audio.

     
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