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  • gilwilson 4:22 AM on September 30, 2021 Permalink | Reply  

    The Great War: Stories Inspired by Items from the First World War 

    The Great War
    Stories Inspired by Items from the First World War
    By: David Almond, John Boyne, Tracy Chevalier, Ursula Dubosarsky, Timothée de Fombelle
    Narrated by: Nico Evers-Swindell, JD Jackson, Gerard Doyle, Richard Halverson
    Length: 6 hrs and 22 mins
    Release date: 04-14-15

    I’m not sure why I picked up this audiobook, I’ve never been a “War Buff,” but I think the idea of the story being told based on items that had some significant value or importance in the war and the people affected by the item and the war was an interesting perspective.  This gave the book a more personal appeal.  

    Some of the items that prompted a story are, a war-effort plate, a helmet with a hole in it, a writing kit, etc.  Each author was given an item and to write the story around/about that item.  My favorite being the helmet.

    The story involving the helmet talks about how the helmet (with a hole in it) was used as a planter, and as a toy by a young boy to pretend he was in the war.  This story sticks out to me because of how the helmet came to be in possession of it and how, until a kid doing a project for school, it had served a mundane purpose.  The boy learns of his family member who originally wore the helmet and maybe a bit more about the human condition.

    This book about the Great War does have some war stories, but it is much more than that.  It explores not only the war but how it affected regular people.  (wives, mothers, sons, friends)  The book doesn’t glorify or damn war, but merely gives it a human connection.  

    A simple pencil in this book, has so much more surrounding it.  I would highly recommend this book to any high school wanting to teach more than just dates and places, but also the philosophy of it all, the human condition.  

    Publisher’s Summary

    In a powerful collection, eleven internationally acclaimed fiction writers draw on personal objects to bring the First World War to life for listeners of all ages.

    A toy soldier. A butter dish. A compass. Mundane objects, perhaps, but to the remarkable authors in this collection, artifacts such as these have inspired stories that go to the heart of the human experience of World War I. Each author was invited to choose an object that had a connection to the war – a writing kit for David Almond, a helmet for Michael Morpurgo – and use it as the inspiration for an original short story. What results is an extraordinary collection, illustrated throughout by the award-winning Jim Kay and featuring photographs of the objects with accounts of their history and the authors’ reasons for selecting them. A blend of fiction and real-life events, this unique anthology provides young listeners with a personal window into the Great War and the people affected by it, and serves as an invaluable resource for families and teachers alike.

    ©2014 Walker Books Ltd., first U.S. edition published by Candlewick Press. (P)2015 Brilliance Audio, all rights reserved. “Our Jacko” © 2014 by Michael Morpurgo. “Another Kind of Missing” © 2014 by A. L. Kennedy. “Don’t Call It Glory” © 2014 by Marcus Sedgwick. “The Country You Called Home” © 2014 by John Boyne. “When They Were Needed Most” © 2014 by Tracy Chevalier. “A World That Has No War in It” © 2014 by David Almond. “A Harlem Hellfighter and His Horn” © 2014 by Tanya Lee Stone. “Maud’s Story” © 2014 by Adèle Geras. “Captain Rosalie” © 2014 by Timothée de Fombelle; translation © 2014 by Sam Gordon. “Each Slow Dusk” © 2014 by Sheena Wilkinson. “Little Wars” © 2014 by Ursula Dubosarsky.

     
  • gilwilson 2:55 PM on September 29, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , terry pratchett,   

    The Globe: The Science of Discworld II: A Novel 

    The Globe: The Science of Discworld II: A Novel
    By: Terry Pratchett, Ian Stewart, Jack Cohen
    Narrated by: Steven Briggs, Michael Fenton Stevens
    Series: Science of Discworld, Book 2
    Length: 12 hrs and 46 mins
    Release date: 01-20-15

    I dabbled in fantasy fiction back in the 80s and part of the 90s. I became curious about the genre after getting addicted to playing the RPG “Dungeons & Dragons.” It seemed I should study the characters in the game, so a friend recommended to me the Discworld books by Sir Terry Pratchett. I immediately was sucked into this humorous romp through the fantasy genre that all happened on disc world which was sitting on top of 4 elephants which were forever fixed upon a turtle flying through space. Weird but fun.

    A few college degrees later I felt as if I grew out of the fantasy genre and became more interested in biographies and sci-fi. Well, the sci-fi was my return to fun and I remembered the Discworld. I thought, well, that’s sci-fi mixed with fantasy. So after a little justification I looked to see what I missed. I then found these Science of Discworld, in which Pratchett and friends started explaining science not just of Discworld but the real world. The lessons in physics and science from these books seemed to soak into my brain better than most of my college classes.

    In this book we return to to the library of the wizards in which they have “created” Roundworld, or rather Earth. This time the elves have discovered the roundworld and wish to make it their own. While the wizards were only interested in the science of such a world they forgot about the inhabitants (humans especially). The elves, not so much. The elves quickly learned how to take advantage of the superstitious creatures of Roundworld.

    The wizards soon have to travel through time to fix and get humans back on track. In doing so this book soon gives the reader an interesting insight to evolution, creativity and language development.

    It’s funny that a book such as this can entertain and educate in such a manner that makes learning fun and really, accidental.

    The audiobook performers are such great comedic actors that you forget your listening to an audiobook but rather travelling to discworld with the wizards. They make the book so much fun to hear.

    Publisher’s Summary
    Roundworld, aka Earth, is under siege. Are three wizards and an orangutan Librarian enough to thwart the Elvish threat?
    When the wizards of Unseen University first created Roundworld, they were so concerned with discovering the rules of this new universe that they overlooked its inhabitants entirely. Now, they have noticed humanity. And humanity has company. Arriving in Roundworld, the wizards find the situation is even worse than they’d expected. Under the elves’ influence, humans are superstitious, fearful, and fruitlessly trying to work magic in a world ruled by logic. Ridcully, Rincewind, Ponder Stibbons, and the orangutan Librarian must travel through time to get humanity back on track and out of the dark ages.
    The Globe goes beyond science to explore the development of the human mind. Terry Pratchett and his acclaimed co-authors Ian Stewart and Jack Cohen combine the tale of the wizards rewriting human history with discussions of the origins and evolution of culture, language, art, and science, offering a fascinating and brilliantly original view of the world we live in.

    ©2015 Terry Pratchett (P)2014 Random House Audio

    audible.com
     
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