Tagged: dc comics Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • gilwilson 1:27 PM on May 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , dc comics, nightwing   

    “Nightwing Vol. 5: Raptor’s Revenge” by Tim Seeley,  and artists Javier Fernandez , Miguel Mendonça and Diana Egea 

    36022871Nightwing Vol. 5: Raptor’s Revenge (Rebirth) (Nightwing: Rebirth) Paperback – May 1, 2018
    by Tim Seeley,  and artists Javier Fernandez , Miguel Mendonça and Diana Egea
    Collects Nightwing #30-34.
    Series: Nightwing: Rebirth
    Paperback: 128 pages
    Publisher: DC Comics (May 1, 2018)

    So what got this major Marvel fan to read a DC comic.  Well, to be honest, I do like DC comics, heck I love all comics, but what grabbed me on this book was the artwork.  I just loved the style and action of the cover alone, and then once I opened book, I loved all of the artwork. It is just a really beautiful book to read.

    Nightwing, the vigilante protector of Blüdhaven has to rely on former enemies to become allies to combat the possible destruction of his city.  The Raptor doesn’t know what he’s in for but soon learns that Nightwing is not a second stringer.

    Beautiful artwork, in depth story and great dialogue work together to create a book worthy of any comic book fan.

     

    Publisher’s Summary

    Assassin. Vigilante. Mentor. And now nemesis. From his career as one of the Court of Owls’ hired killers to his stint as Dick Grayson’s would-be partner and teacher, the man called Raptor has always been one of the world’s deadliest fighters. And now that Nightwing has rejected his offer, he’s poised to become the greatest foe the black-and-blue guardian of Blüdhaven has ever known.

    But Nightwing has other, older enemies in his adopted hometown. Now he’ll need to count on them as allies.

    When Raptor’s vendetta threatens the lives of every man, woman and child in the Blüd, Nightwing is forced to turn to the man who hates him most, Blockbuster, for help. It’s a team-up like nothing Nightwing has ever known–as if Batman and The Joker joined forces.

    That’s exactly what makes the alliance so dangerous. If it succeeds, Raptor will feel victory slip through his talons. But if it fails, the entire city of Blüdhaven will fall…

    Nightwing Vol. 5: Raptor’s Revenge is a pulse-pounding thriller that pits Nightwing against an unforgettable addition to his rogues gallery, from writer Tim Seeley (Batman Eternal) and artists Javier Fernandez (Red Hood/Arsenal), Miguel Mendonça (Wonder Woman) and Diana Egea (Smallville: Season Eleven). Collects Nightwing #30-34.

    Advertisements
     
  • gilwilson 4:03 PM on May 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , dc comics, , ,   

    “Injustice: Gods Among Us: Year One, Vol. 1” by Tom Taylor (Goodreads Author) (Writer), Jheremy Raapack (Artist), Mike S. Miller (Artist), Tom Derenick (Artist), David Yardin (Artist) 

    Injustice: Gods Among Us: Year One, Vol. 117671993
    by Tom Taylor (Goodreads Author) (Writer), Jheremy Raapack (Artist), Mike S. Miller (Artist), Tom Derenick (Artist), David Yardin (Artist)
    Hardcover, 192 pages
    Published November 19th 2013 by DC Comics
    (first published January 15th 2013)
    Collects #1-18 of INJUSTICE: GODS AMONG US

    When the film “Batman v. Superman” was made I’m pretty sure this was the source material used and not the traditional/ “Real” DC comics stories. This graphic novel begins the introduction of the fighting game “Injustice: Gods Among Us.” The videogame is extremely fun to play and the story is very interesting, albeit radically different from any Superman Story.  When the film “Batman v. Superman” was made I’m pretty sure this was the source material used and not the traditional/ “Real” DC comics stories. This graphic novel begins the introduction of the fighting game “Injustice: Gods Among Us.” The videogame is extremely fun to play and the story is very interesting, albeit radically different from any Superman Story.
    If you’ve played the game it would hurt to pick up this graphic novel and get more of the backstory about how Superman and Batman became so divided, and how a world allowed Superman to be a cruel dictator. Yeah, i did say it was radically different.
    The death scenes of two villians are not for the faint of heart so be prepared.

    Publisher’s Summary

    From the makers of Mortal Kombat comes the critically acclaimed prequel comic to the smash hit fighting game Injustice: Gods Among Us!

    Things in the DC Universe have changed after Superman is tricked into destroying the one thing he loves the most. Now unwilling to let crime go unpunished, the heroes of our world must choose if they are with Superman or against him. But not every country will submit to his new world order and neither will Superman’s greatest threat-Batman!

    Collects #1-18 of INJUSTICE: GODS AMONG US (issues #1-6 in print).

     
  • gilwilson 2:55 PM on May 4, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , christopher priest, , dc comics, , , justice league, , the spectre   

    Audiobook Review: “Green Lantern: Sleepers (Volume 3)” by Christopher J. Priest 

    dcgl03

    “Green Lantern: Sleepers (Volume 3)”
    by Christopher J. Priest
    Multi-cast performance
    Produced by GraphicAudio
    Approx. 6 hours

    I just love it when I get my comic books and audiobooks mixed and can enjoy the comics during the same situations I can enjoy my comic books. GraphicAudio has provided the means for me to enjoy both with their outstanding productions of DC comics’ novelizations of their heroes. It took me a while to get through all 3 books in this “Sleepers” collection, but the reason for that is I was milking the experience. I have heard all of the productions from GraphicAudio’s comics genre and didn’t want the experience to end. Luckily they getting geared up to release a new DC Comics product, so I won’t have to wait long.

    The “Movie in your Mind” concept from GraphicAudio is always more than delivered, especially in these audio “movies” created from the graphic novel industry. GraphicAudio creates an entire ambiance that could only exist in the worlds where a ring created in mysticism could create a force for either good or evil.

    With creatively orchestrated sound effects this book’s entertainment factor shot through the roof. The Green Lantern who is the focus of this audiobook is the Hal Jordan Green Lantern, and it occurs in the continuity where Hal Jordan has taken on the role of “The Spectre.” With the powers of The Spectre, Hal Jordan is able to exist in all points of all of time and space at once. Just put into your mind the ambient sounds that all of time and space would create. No matter how expansive your imagination I’m pretty sure it in no way it comes close to the artistically created special effects this audiobook contains.

    From beginning to end the creativity is not limited to sound effects. The musical score envelops the story and weaves in and out to create even more comic book superhero ambiance. Then to top it all off the voice actors performing the various parts in the book are stellar. Each character is portrayed with a vocal artist who is able to bring to life every aspect by completely capturing their entire psyches.

    This story is one that surprised me. The surprise came in the form of a way to tie in all 3 volumes of this series. As I listened to the first two books in the series I saw how they were a little tied in with the common theme of some renegade yellow power rings created by Sinestro, but this book not only concludes the trilogy, it also ties it all together making one big package. While each of the books could be read/heard as separate stories, the concept works best when all are consumed together and in order.
    The final volume of this epic trilogy, Sleepers, Book 3 features Hal Jordan, the most famous of Earth’s modern-day Green Lanterns and now the Spectre. The Spectre has all the abilities a god would have including, but not limited to, manipulation of time and space, control over all matter, invulnerability, and limitless strength. But just after the beginning of this story, Hal has been stripped of his powers, and it is now up to him to fight the clones of the villain Sinestro, set loose by actions in the trilogy’s first volume. In order to save the Earth, he may have to sacrifice himself by taking the Sinestro power rings on a one-way trip to the anti-matter universe. The rings take over some members of the Justice League and the battles ensue. Some great action in this book and brought to full 3-D life by Graphic Audio.

     
  • gilwilson 8:51 PM on February 20, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , christopher j. priest, , dc comics, , , , ,   

    “Green Lantern: Sleepers (Volume 2)” by Christopher J. Priest & Michael Ahn 

    dcgl02large

    “Green Lantern: Sleepers (Volume 2)”
    by Christopher J. Priest & Michael Ahn
    Multi-cast performance
    Produced by GraphicAudio
    Approx. 6 Hours

    Yes I will fully accept the fact that I am a nerd, I love my comic books. I used to be such a die hard fan of comic books that I even picked a side. I was the hardcore Marvel comics fan, so much so that I wouldn’t even look at a DC comic. Later in life I learned, it was okay to like all the comics. I began reading some of the other publishers like; Image, Dark Horse, et. al, but when it came to DC I just felt like I was cheating for some reason. I liked to read The Flash, and Batman, but for the other heroes I just couldn’t make myself do it.

    In comes my love for audiobooks and what lead me to where I am now. I used to make monthly road trips that would last about 8 hours and I would pass the time with audiobooks, on top of that my work commute was 30 – 45 minutes depending on Kansas City traffic, so there was more time for audiobook absorption. So I had more time for comics than audiobooks. Then to my amazement a few years ago I was introduced to GraphicAudio because of their production of some comic book novelizations into audiobooks. GraphicAudio was taking some DC comics novels and turning them into audiobooks, but not just an audiobook rather, “A movie for your mind.”

    GraphicAudio uses a highly skilled team of voice actors, out of this world sound effects and ready-for-theatrical-release music and mixes it all in to make the superheroes come to life in full 3d sound and mental imagery. GraphicAudio has a great library of DC comics based audiobooks and I understand will be working on some Marvel collections soon (I can hardly wait for those productions). These productions are nothing short of amazing. When you think of comics you think of the great artwork that steers the story. GraphicAudio is able to take the comic artwork and bring it to your mind through sound. Their sound effects sound just as though they are leaping out of the pages of a comic, not the funny “kapows” and “blams” but with Earth shattering explosions, and the sound of Green Lantern’s aura that sounds as though it is surrounding you as the listener. GraphicAudio has created the perfect way to listen to comic books.

    This audiobook is the second in a series written by Christopher J. Priest and each book is linked in a very cool way that makes it so as a fan you have to read or, in this case, listen to, all the books. I won’t give away how they are linked because it is a bit of a spoiler, and I don’t like to give out too many spoilers. This book covers the Golden Age Green Lantern, Alan Scott.

    “Sleepers Book Two” tells the origin story of how Alan Scott and how he came to fight crime as the Green Lantern. The other aspect of this story that makes it unique is that the Golden Age of comics occurred during World War II, and while nations were at war this super hero was fighting bank robbers not Nazis. With that aspect a question is formed, “Why doesn’t he go wipe out the Nazis, with all that power he yields?” Well eventually the Green Lantern, Alan Scott, does go overseas but once he does he meets up with Malvolio, a Green Lantern (at least at first appearance to Alan) who can help Alan discover what it means to hold the power of the Green Lantern. The beginning of this book explains the origin of Malvolio and the nice part of this is that the reader/listener knows that Malvolio is not a good guy and only the worst can be expected.

    In the beginning of the book it is revealed that Malvolio is a 17th-century supervillain, actually an anti-Green Lantern who wants to take over the world. The Guardians imprison Malvolio, but he escapes and makes it back to Earth just in time for WWII. Malvolio decides to cut a deal with Hitler that endangers the entire Allied campaign in Europe and the Pacific. Not one to think small, he is determined to eliminate the entire Green Lantern Corps, destroy Earth, and decimate all other worlds that have ever had the protection of a Green Lantern.

    Great origin story, great production and great super-powered battles make this a must hear audio book from GraphicAudio.

     
  • gilwilson 10:50 PM on June 18, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , dc comics, , , , , , , ,   

    “Green Lantern: Sleepers – book 1” by Christopher J. Priest & Mike Baron 

    “Green Lantern: Sleepers – book 1”
    by Christopher J. Priest & Mike Baron
    Full Cast Production
    Produced by GraphicAudio
    Approx 6 hours

    Yes I love my comic books, and yes I love my audiobooks, so when I get the chance to merge the two I jump on it. You are probably thinking, “But isn’t the fun in comics the artwork? How do you see the artwork in an audiobook?” I used to think that until I got my hands on my first GraphicAudio production. The slogan for GraphicAudio is “A Movie in Your Mind” and boy do they ever deliver. GraphicAudio uses superb voice actors mixed in with original music and mind-blowing sound effects that take the full artwork experience of a comic book and bring it to life in their great audiobook productions. While this book was written as a novel and didn’t have the artwork of a comic book, GraphicAudio is able to bring this book to life in their full production, “Movie in Your Mind.”

    This book is actually part of a trilogy in which each book focuses on a different Green Lantern. If you are not a regular reader of the Green Lantern Comics, let me explain a bit on that. Throughout the continuity of DC comics there have been several different versions of the Green Lantern, beginning with Alan Scott, the Golden Age Green Lantern, the thing to note is that he got his power from a lantern created from a meteor. The Green Lanterns got their powers from rings created by the Guardians on the planet Oa. Alan Scott is also the father of Jade who is now dating Kyle Raynor, the current incarnation of Green Lantern. Raynor is the focus of this story, but more on that later. Since I’ve already mentioned Raynor, I’ll now mention the third Green Lantern you need to know about for this book and trilogy, Hal Jordan.

    Hal Jordan was a founding member of the Justice League, and the first Green Lantern to get powers from the Guardians. During the DC comics history Jordan became a bad guy, known as Parallax and attempted to commit cosmic genocide. It was because of this that the Guardians made Kyle Raynor the new Green Lantern. To make things short Hal has now become the Spectre. The Spectre historically has been judge, jury and executioner for people, countries and planets and usually in a very harsh manner. Hal, because of his time as Parallax, chooses to be a more peaceful Spectre and takes more of a pacifist’s view of helping out other heroes.

    Okay with all that back history let’s talk about this first book in the “Sleepers” trilogy. The book begins with a battle in World War II in which the soldiers are fighting on the ground and the superheroes battling in the air. When a medic finds a soldier dying on the field, the dying soldier insists the medic, Eddie Rochefort (Roach to his friends), take his ring. The medic takes the ring after the man takes his last breath and passes on. Jump now a couple of decades and Hal Jordan as Green Lantern teams up with Black Canary, Ganthet and Green Arrow to defeat Sinestro in the Rocky Mountains in the U.S. They send his remains back to his anti-matter universe and that is the end of Sinestro. Now jump to “today” and Kyle Raynor as Green Lantern has just proposed to his girlfriend, Jade, and she has turned him down. While looking for a shirt in his closet he finds a pregnancy test in her closet and he freaks out and takes a trip to Saturn.

    While around Saturn, Kyle finds remains of a ship that look as though it was destroyed millions of years ago and may have come from the anti-matter universe. After gathering some samples and sending back to Justice League headquarters for analysis, Kyle returns home to find Jade getting friendly with the exterminator, Eddie Rochefort II (Roach to his friends).

    Years ago Eddie the second was digging in his grandfather’s attic to find a ring that was similar to a Green Lantern Ring, but when he discovered the ring his Grandfather is burned alive by an alien monster. Eddie is then visited by an alien craft years later and soon becomes the next Sinestro. With his fixation on Jade, he kidnaps her and takes her to the anti-matter universe where an invasion is being planned.

    It is now up to Kyle Raynor, Green Lantern, to save Jade, destroy this second Sinestro and save the universe. Seeking help from Hal Jordan doesn’t seem possible since he’s off on his hippie Spectre kick, and the Justice League all seem to be out of reach. Can the Green Lantern stop Sinestro and the invasion in time? In a full-scale audio explosion from GraphicAudio you will have fun all the way to the exciting end.

     
  • gilwilson 10:42 PM on November 21, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , dc comics, dirk maggs,   

    “Superman on Trial” Written and directed by Dirk Maggs 

    “Superman on Trial”
    Written and directed by Dirk Maggs
    Multicast performance from BBC Radio
    Published by AudioGo
    1 hour

    First broadcast in 1988 to celebrate 50 years of Superman, This BBC production features the “Man of Steel” standing trial for his crimes against humanity.  With Lex Luthor as the prosecuting attorney and with Lois Lane as Superman’s defense attorney, of sorts.  In the continuity of the Superman Saga this is based partly on “Superman: Last Son of Krypton” and some early issues of “Adventures of Superman.”

    AudioGo has remastered this broadcast and even added in some never-before-heard scenes.  With superb vocal acting, great sound effects and incidental music that pushes the story, this short audio comic book is the perfect way to bring a comic book to audio life.   There are even some fun special guests that make this more than just a story about Superman, but also brings to light how comic books are needed for all ages.

    The trial begins with Superman chained down and unable to move or speak, Lex Luthor insists the trial goes on and Lois Lane is forced to defen Superman.  Luthor brings charges that range from destruction of property to assaulting humans, and with Superman not of this Earth he should be banished to the “Phantom Zone” (negative space created by Superman’s real father Jor-El).  Lois brings witnesses to talk about how Superman has done nothing but stand for Truth, Justice and the American Way.

    The unique aspect of this audio comic book is that the trial then turns to being a message about how comic books in general are important.  This is done with some very cool special guests, Adam West, Jenette Kahn (President of DC Comics) and Dave Gibbons (Co-creator of Watchmen).  These three real life witnesses talk about how comic books, especially Superman comics promote literacy, always teach the reader the difference between right and wrong, and how all ages can and do enjoy comics.  I found it really cool when Adam West was leaving and Batman was entering the courtroom and Batman was delayed getting to the stand.  Very fun subtle context.

    Very nice production bringing an interesting comic book story to life.

     
  • gilwilson 10:16 PM on November 17, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , dc comics,   

    “Batman: The Lazarus Syndrome” BBC Radio Drama Written by Simon Bullivant and Dirk Maggs 

    “Batman: The Lazarus Syndrome”
    BBC Radio Drama Written by Simon Bullivant and Dirk Maggs
    Multi-cast performance
    Produced by AudioGo
    45 minutes

    One of the many things I love about comic books is that they are a quick read.  I love carrying them with me and when I have a few minutes relax and read an exciting story.  This audiobook gave me the feel of a real comic book, not only was it a full story in 45 minutes but the voice acting music and sound effects brought a comic book story to audio life.  Every aspect of this audio drama gives the full color graphics of a comic into sound.

    The story was a 1989 BBC Radio 4 broadcast, produced to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the popular comic book character Batman.  If you are wondering where in the Batman continuity the story falls, it contains references to such Batman stories as Batman: The Killing Joke, Batman: A Death in the Family, Batman: Year Three, and Batman: Son of the Demon.  AudioGo has released the performance as this audiobook.

    On the anniversary of his parents murder Batman is attacked by an old enemy. Then there is an explosion and it seems Batman is no more. With the disappearance of the Batman Commissioner Gordon begins searching for any lead, even going as far as arranging a meeting with The Joker and Catwoman. The commissioner then gets an audiotape which seems to be from Batman, telling the commissioner of Batman’s alter ego, Bruce Wayne, and that receipt of the tape verifies the death of Batman.  But when Gordon goes to Wayne Manor finding Bruce Wayne liquidating assets, Gordon realizes something is wrong.  Barbara Gordon the commissioner’s daughter and former Batgirl (before The Joker shot her and put her permanently in a wheelchair) begins her computer expertise to hack into the Bat-computer and find out where the real Batman is.

    While in Wayne Manor Bruce Wayne informs Alfred and Nightwing (Dick Grayson, formerly Robin) that he is hanging up the cape and cowl forever.  He begins selling off all of Wayne Enterprises and plans to relocate the Bat-computer.

    At the same time in some unknown location the true Batman awakens in the same room as Talia (the daughter of Ras’ al Ghul) and realizes he needs to regain his strength and awareness before this impostor uses Wayne Enterprises to bring ruin to the world.

    In an exciting audio-comic book, you will feel every punch and smell the dankness of the bat-cave thanks to the expert production fro BBC Radio and AudioGo.

     
  • gilwilson 9:40 PM on April 21, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , dc comics, general zod, , krypton, , , , , the last days of krypton,   

    “The Last Days of Krypton” by Kevin J. Anderson 

    “The Last Days of Krypton”
    by Kevin J. Anderson
    Read by William Dufris
    Produced by Tantor Media, 2007
    Approx 15.5 hours

    I have only recently become a fan of DC comics, “Make Mine Marvel” was my slogan, but after tackling audiobook novelizations of DC heroes I’ve received a more in depth knowledge of what makes up the DC Universe.   The only problem is that after almost a century of heroes it’s hard to keep continuity.  There have been many stories, for example, told of the destruction of Superman’s home planet, Krypton.  Did the sun go supernova, did something strike the planet,did the planet implode?  An answer to each of these questions has appeard as a bit of an explanation throughout the run of Superman comics and if someone were to read all the comics from the beginning they may get a bit confused.  There are other questions I’ve had such as where did Supergirl come from, some versions she’s the cousin of Superman other’s she’s an angel.  Well if Krypton was destroyed how did she survive?   Remember the Superman movies with Christopher Reeve?   How did General Zod and his two assistants come to be trapped in the neutral zone? Then there’s Brainiac, what’s his story?

    Kevin J. Anderson has tried to sum up all these problems and write a history of Kal-el’s (Superman’s) home planet, Krypton in the days just before the little baby that would become Superman was blasted off toward Earth.  Kevin is not a stranger to taking an established piece of work and adding to it, he has teamed up with Brian Herbert, son of Frank Herbert, to add stories to the “Dune” universe of novels.  Having read and appreciated the work he has done in that realm I knew this would be a good book.    The interesting aspect of this novel is that it is really not a superhero story but rather a piece of science-fiction with some superhero potential added to push the story along.  This story not only explores the destruction of Krypton but also reveals the politics of this planet that just wanted to stay alone in the universe.

    The reader, William Dufris, did an adequate job of reading the book, but there were times when some of the characters seemed parodies in the vocal changes.  It’s like Dufris wanted to turn this into a superhero story from with similar vocalizations to the ’60s “Batman” tv series.  There was no campiness to the writing but some of the dialogue was read that way.  But it was not enough to keep me from enjoying the fun sci-fi story from Kevin J. Anderson.

    The novel explores how Jor-el (Superman’s father) discovers the planet and its sun is dying, and through the xenophobic politics of the elders is constantly sent packing when he is trying to save the planet.  Soon alien forces invade some friendly some not so friendly and change the way the council works but it is too late and soon Commissioner Zod takes over and is determined to rule Krypton.  In doing so, Zod, sacrifices many lives needlessly and puts the planet at risk, it is up to Jor-el and Zor-el (Jor-el’s brother) to save Krypton.  Are their efforts to late?

    This story is full of adventure, excitement, passion and glory and is a perfect read for comic book and science fiction lovers alike.

    “The Last Days of Krypton”
    by Kevin J. Anderson
    Read by William Dufris
    Produced by Tantor Media, 2007
    Approx 15.5 hours

    I have only recently become a fan of DC comics, “Make Mine Marvel” was my slogan, but after tackling audiobook novelizations of DC heroes I’ve received a more in depth knowledge of what makes up the DC Universe.   The only problem is that after almost a century of heroes it’s hard to keep continuity.  There have been many stories, for example, told of the destruction of Superman’s home planet, Krypton.  Did the sun go supernova, did something strike the planet,did the planet implode?  An answer to each of these questions has appeard as a bit of an explanation throughout the run of Superman comics and if someone were to read all the comics from the beginning they may get a bit confused.  There are other questions I’ve had such as where did Supergirl come from, some versions she’s the cousin of Superman other’s she’s an angel.  Well if Krypton was destroyed how did she survive?   Remember the Superman movies with Christopher Reeve?   How did General Zod and his two assistants come to be trapped in the neutral zone? Then there’s Brainiac, what’s his story?

    Kevin J. Anderson has tried to sum up all these problems and write a history of Kal-el’s (Superman’s) home planet, Krypton in the days just before the little baby that would become Superman was blasted off toward Earth.  Kevin is not a stranger to taking an established piece of work and adding to it, he has teamed up with Brian Herbert, son of Frank Herbert, to add stories to the “Dune” universe of novels.  Having read and appreciated the work he has done in that realm I knew this would be a good book.    The interesting aspect of this novel is that it is really not a superhero story but rather a piece of science-fiction with some superhero potential added to push the story along.  This story not only explores the destruction of Krypton but also reveals the politics of this planet that just wanted to stay alone in the universe.

    The reader, William Dufris, did an adequate job of reading the book, but there were times when some of the characters seemed parodies in the vocal changes.  It’s like Dufris wanted to turn this into a superhero story from with similar vocalizations to the ’60s “Batman” tv series.  There was no campiness to the writing but some of the dialogue was read that way.  But it was not enough to keep me from enjoying the fun sci-fi story from Kevin J. Anderson.

    The novel explores how Jor-el (Superman’s father) discovers the planet and its sun is dying, and through the xenophobic politics of the elders is constantly sent packing when he is trying to save the planet.  Soon alien forces invade some friendly some not so friendly and change the way the council works but it is too late and soon Commissioner Zod takes over and is determined to rule Krypton.  In doing so, Zod, sacrifices many lives needlessly and puts the planet at risk, it is up to Jor-el and Zor-el (Jor-el’s brother) to save Krypton.  Are their efforts to late?

    This story is full of adventure, excitement, passion and glory and is a perfect read for comic book and science fiction lovers alike.

     
  • gilwilson 10:22 PM on March 10, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , dc comics, , , , , , , , new gods, , , ,   

    “Final Crisis” by Greg Cox 

    “Final Crisis”
    by Greg Cox
    Multi-cast performance
    Produced 2010, by GraphicAudio
    Approx. 8 Hours

    “Final Crisis” was a crossover storyline that appeared in DC comics published throughout 2008, primarily the seven-issue miniseries of the same name was written by Grant Morrison.  This was the last of the multiverse type series from DC and sort of closed up some gaps left in the previous titles; “Crisis on Infinite Earths”,  “Infinite Crisis”, “52”, and “Countdown.”  However I think this created more questions than answers and served no other purpose but to confuse the reader.  While having some great confrontations and interesting twists on science and gods the story just didn’t do it for me.  I was so glad I listened to the audio book format of this title.

    As usual GraphicAudio delivers this audiobook with a punch, and I’m talking one of those full-graphic-with-exploding-colors-as-only-seen-in-comic-books punches.  When GraphicAudio promises a “Movie in your Mind” they aren’t exaggerating.  First off the voice actors are superb and voice each character with precision accuracy, Superman sounds like Superman, Batman sounds like Batman and so on.  There is no denying the excellence in the talent pool here.  The sound effects will blast you out of your seat.  With planets exploding or crumbling, a black hole sucking in the multiverse and even Green Lantern’s ring fizzling out, the sound effects are perfect. And the music, well pretty much all I can say here is “WOW!”  The music moves the story, mood and action perfectly.  All in all these GraphicAudio productions are perfect.  For me it was the only saving grace in this title.

    The gist of this story is that one of the new gods, Orion, is murdered and another new god, Darkseid, sees this as his chance to take over Earth.  Also one of Earth’s multiverse monitors is stripped of his powers for letting Earth 51 be destroyed.  While some of my favorite heroes play major parts in this, The Flashes (yes 3 generations of The Flash) open a time portal allowing things to begin and end, and The Green Lantern Corps try to stop Darkseid, I think the story relied too heavily on Superman.

    There was one saving grace for the story and that was the creation of a young Japanese group of superheroes.  Mixing superheroes with Japanese pop-culture, the characters are: Most Excellent Superbat, Big Atomic Lantern Boy, Shy Crazy Lolita Canary, Shiny Happy Aquazon and Well-Spoken Sonic Lightning Flash.  I first had some good laughs with their names but sheesh the way they interacted was fun.  At one point all the characters had revealed their powers, except one, and when asked what his was Most Excellent Superbat responded, “Mine is the best of all, I can buy anything.”

    Throughout the story I was confused as to what caused what and with The Flashes and Superman doing a little time traveling that just made it even more hard to follow.  But thanks to GraphicAudio, I had a great time listening.

     
  • gilwilson 9:44 PM on February 22, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: alex ross, , , , , , , , dc comics, , kingdom come, ,   

    “Kingdom Come” adapted by John Whitman based on a story by Mark Waid and Alex Ross and the novelization by Elliot S. Maggin. 

    “Kingdom Come”
    adapted by John Whitman
    based on a story by Mark Waid and Alex Ross and the novelization by Elliot S. Maggin.
    Multi-cast performance
    Published 1998 byTime Warner AudioBooks
    approx. 3 hours

    I have only recently become a fan of DC comics.  Throughout most of my life I was mostly a Marvel comics fan, especially Spider-Man, because Marvel seemed to me to be more of an Everyman becoming a hero, and DC heroes were rich or from other planets.  Sure, I crossed over once in a while for The Flash, and Batman, but that was pretty much it.  I’m not sure if it is because I got older or DC comics decided to become more Everyman but I’ve recently been dipping into the DC pool.  A lot of this influence is because of my experience with some great DC comics audiobooks.  This storyline I ran across accidentally while looking for more comic/novel based audiobooks.  This one was originally done as an audio drama with full sound effects and actors voicing each character.  This seemed up my alley so, I gave it a listen and was treated to some fun superhero action.

    I mentioned Everyman aspects of comics that I prefer because this book actually looks at the Heroes as gods aspect that I didn’t like.  It seems that many people of the Earth in this DC comics creation didn’t like it either.  Before I go into that further, a neat aspect of this story is the combination of the Book of Revelations from the Holy Bible with the possible end of the world that could happen thanks to the battles between super heroes and super villains.   Pastor Norman McKay is receiving visions of the end of times, the mysterious hero The Spectre, takes Pastor McKay on a trip through time and space to the various heroes and what has brought about this end of times.

    The Earth has a sudden influx of MetaHumans, these are humans that have developed super hero type abilities.  When one metahuman, known as Magog, kills the Joker, it seems this would be a good thing, but a hospital full of patients and one Lois Lane, wife of Superman, is collateral damage, does not seem to bother this new breed of metahumans.  Superman retires to his Fortress of Solitude and leaves mankind to fend for itself.  Jump ahead a few years and the metahumans have gotten rid of all the super villains and now they are bored.  So instead of just sitting back and enjoying they peace they begin to battle each other, every time taking out large chunks of various cities.  When Magog and a group of metahumans destroy Kansas, Wonder Woman seeks out Superman so they can put a stop to all the metahumans,  kind of like the band is getting back together for the Justice League, but, it’s not all that easy, it seems Lex Luthor has survived and is getting the villains remaining back together for one final battle.

    Can the Justice Leage reform and put aside years of apathy and ill-feelings?  This story has some great battles and some great action with an ending only a comic book could put together.

    This audio drama packs a pretty good superhero punch with some great voice acting and some excellent sound effects to keep you in the moment.  My only beef is with that of the actor portraying Pastor McKay.  He is shown all the destruction and despair and on top of that is receiving vision of a Revelations scale, yet he’s extremely chipper and happy throughout his dialogue.  He just didn’t seem believable.  Everything else was excellent.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: