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  • gilwilson 9:48 PM on January 10, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: apocalypse, , , , , , , , , purification, , ,   

    “Autumn: Purification” by David Moody 

    “Autumn: Purification”
    by David Moody
    Published by Thomas Dunne Books
    329 pages

    I’m continuing in my excursion into the Autumn series by David Moody, and with the third book out of the way, I’m more convinced that this is NOT a zombie series.  Although the walking corpses do prevail in these books, the series is more about survival on a post apocalyptic world than just the horror of walking dead.  Ever since book one I’ve been wondering why these meatbags haven’t been eating the living, but at the same time with the constant despair and need to survive guiding those that were immune to the virus, this series is just a good story.  My love of all things zombie got me interested in the books, but it was the excellent storytelling by David Moody that kept me reading.

    In the first book, “Autumn,” we were introduced to Michael and Emma as a mysterious virus struck nearly 90% of the world’s population dead.  The deaths happened within seconds after contracting the virus.  Michael and Emma were among the few survivors that grouped together in a small town community center.  The two met up with Carl and decided that they had pretty much the run of the world since there nearly everyone else was dead.  When the bodies of those struck down by the virus began to rise and walk around the 3 decided to head off and find safety in an abandoned farm.  The bodies then actually started to attack, not eating the flesh of victims but just the mere mass of lots of bodies was enough to bring harm.  Carl tried to go back to the Community center but found it overrun with bodies and he finally fell to the horde.  Michael and Emma took off to find somewhere safe.

    In book two, “Autumn: The City,” the story runs parallel to the first book but this time from the view of survivors in a large city.  This second book also throws in that the military had a bit of a warning of the virus and military personnel were immediately sent to bunkers before the virus struck.  The survivors in the city are holed up in a university but the crowding from the walking cadavers soon makes it obvious they need to relocate.  When the military decides to send out a scouting party to determine what has happened and the current status, two of the soldiers are left behind when the troop transport is overwhelmed by walking dead.  One of the soldiers has his protective gear removed and dies within seconds showing the virus is still in the air.  The second soldier, Cooper, discovers he is immune and finds the survivors in the University.  Eventually with the help of Cooper the survivors escape the University to find the underground military bunker, on the way to the bunker they meet up with Michael and Emma in a motor home.  The few survivors get into the bunker but not allowed past the decontamination area, now safe underground.

    Now for book three, “Autumn: Purification.”  We join all the survivors as they continue to exist in the bunker.  Problems arise in the bunker when the now aggressive walking corpses are blocking the vents which feed air into the bunker.  The undead are blocking by sheer masses of bodies in the area, attracted to the living that are in the area.  The military tries to clear the vents but each time they go out they attract more bodies.  On the final attempt to clear the bodies, something goes wrong and the survivors must leave, able to save a few of the soldiers after the main bunker is closed to the outside.   In a convoy of the motor home, a prison bus and a troop transport they stop in a nearby town to regroup.  After clearing out a few animated bodies, the survivors spend the night in a relatively secure area.

    The next morning a helicopter arrives in town and lands in the secure area.  The survivors from the bunker are told by the pilot of a plan to go to safety.  The safety comes in the form of an island which had a small population.  Once the few bodies are cleared the island should be a haven of safety compared to the mainland.  The survivors then only have to drive to the airport where the pilot is stationed and then, using the chopper and one airplane go to the island.  Not as easy as it sounds, especially with the dead becoming more self-aware.

    What I really liked about this story of survival, is that David Moody uses the normal person as the main characters.  Not like other zombie movies.  Have you ever noticed how in other zombie movies your everyday average person suddenly becomes an expert marksman when zombies attack?  Not so in this book.  These people panic, don’t shoot straight, and often double think their movements.  Basically what your everyday normal human would do when struck by the sudden terror of not only being one of the last humans alive but also the terror of the dead walking around.

    Now for the fourth and final book in the series, “Autumn: Disintegration.”

     
  • gilwilson 9:02 PM on January 2, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: apocalypse, , , , , , , , the city, ,   

    “Autumn: The City” by David Moody 

    “Autumn: The City”
    by David Moody
    Published by Thomas Dunne Books (2011)
    330 pages

    It’s back to some zombie action once again.  This time around I’m continuing in a series written by David Moody, one of the best zombie horror writers, I’ve read.  The funny thing is, the zombie word has yet to appear in this series and this is the second book.  Sure there are reanimated corpses, cadavers, bodies walking around, but no one ever brings up the “Z” word.  There is once that one of the characters compares the walking corpses to those in the movies their kid used to watch.  But Moody is able to bring you the horror of zombies without the word or even flesh eating monsters.

    Sure the gore is still there with rotting flesh and dead people walking around and looking decayed, but they don’t attack, at least not at first, and then when they do, it’s more a matter of the numbers of dead bodies, than the fear of being eaten or worse turned into one of the living dead.  This makes the horror a deeper more emotional horror and plays on a different side of fear.

    Being part two of what is a four part (so far) series, I’ll give you a little bit of a background, but one thing I noticed was that this book could easily be read independent of the first book, which was titled, “Autumn.”  Both books basically run parallel to each other until later in the book when a couple of characters from the first book show up and blend in with this story.

    In “Autumn” the same as this book it all starts out with a day like any other, people on their way to work when all of a sudden many are struck with a sudden illness that within seconds leaves them dead, choking on their own blood.  In the first book a few survivors meet up in a community center all dumbfounded that suddenly everyone they know is now dead.  In fact all the deaths happen so suddenly that the roads are jammed with wrecked vehicles, and bodies.  Not knowing what to do the few group in the center just simply trying to make sense of it all.  After a couple of days the dead bodies begin to get up and walk around.  Not threatened by the slow ambling bodies, the survivors ignore the bodies walking around not able to cope with this new horror.  The bodies simply walk until something is in the way and then change directions.  After another couple of days the bodies begin to respond to noises made by the survivors.  Still not threatening but nonetheless horrifying, Three of the survivors including Michael and Emma decide to head out of the small town and out into the country where there will be less bodies walking around and try to make a new start of it.

    They find a farm in the middle of nowhere and begin to set up house trying to begin anew in this strange new world.  The problems begin when the dead bodies begin to get more aggressive, the walking dead soon begin attacking, and with their sheer numbers and being attracted to the living, drive the survivors out of the farmhouse and Michael and Emma return to the town to find the rest of the survivors.

    Now for this book, “Autumn” The City.” The beginning parallels the events in the first book but this time around the survivors are in a major city.  With the higher population of the city the sheer numbers of walking cadavers soon overpowers the survivors who are holed up in a local university.  The thing that makes this book a little more different and interesting is that Moody introduces the military into the mix.  At the beginning of the book a strange alert goes out and all local military are shuffled off to a hidden underground base.  The military is forgotten until after the point when the walking corpses start to get a little more aggressive.  At this point the hidden away soldiers decide that after a few weeks and no communications with the outside world a scout party needs to be sent out.

    A troop transport is loaded up and some soldiers venture out into the city to find out what has happened to the world.  Mistaking the walking dead for infected citizens, they stop and try to find out what is going on.  The undead soon attack the soldiers causing all to leave, two soldiers are left behind as the transport leaves back to base.  When one of the left behind takes off his mask he soon succumbs to the disease and dies instantly.  The other soldier, Cooper, decides not to take off his gear and seeks out shelter from the infected.

    Soon some of the survivors decide they are no longer safe in the University and need a plan to escape to somewhere where there are not millions of walking corpses attacking.  When Cooper shows up at the University they realize the base must be the place to go.  But first, transportation is needed and then to escape the millions of dead in the city.

    Lots of zombie horror, but not the typical flesh eating terror, rather the survival and psychological horror of the end of the world.  Now on to book 3 “Purification.”

     
  • gilwilson 9:26 PM on December 23, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: apocalypse, , , , , , , , , , , them or us,   

    “Them or Us” (book 3 of the Hater Trilogy) by David Moody 

    “Them or Us” (book 3 of the Hater Trilogy)
    by David Moody
    published by Thomas Dunne Books
    354 pages

    David Moody has a way of creating books about zombies without having zombies.  In his series “Autumn” the “Z” word is never mentioned but there are reanimated corpses.  In the Hater Trilogy he has created a bunch of mindless fighters who never eat the flesh of their victims but go into uncontrollable rages until the victim is dead.  So while they may not be be zombie books, they still create the same horror of a zombie book, but without the gore.

    In the Hater trilogy, it turns out that some switch is thrown in the human brain where about half of the poulation become Haters.  The Haters see an Unchanged and that flipped switch causes the Hater to attack fight and not stop until the Unchanged is destroyed.  Even when a Hater has all his limbs incapacitated they will still fight until one of them is dead.  With this aspect Moody is able to explore the darker side of a zombie apocalypse.  The darker side being how do you survive when all is gone, every aspect of civilization breaks down and no longer is there a means for food to be obtained by just going to the corner market.

    In the first book, “Hater” the switch was flipped and all the population began a war that would leave the world scarred forever.  In this book we were introduced to Danny McCoyne who became a Hater but first watched the world collapse, losing is family.  In the Second book, “Dog Blood,” the world was at war Haters vs. the Unchanged.  Danny sought to find his daughter who he knew was like himself, a Hater.  The problem was, though, his wife and two sons were Unchanged.  Danny had to fight the Hate inside to sneak into Unchanged refugee camps to find his daughter without being discovered.  All this while a major world war was going on between the Haters and Unchanged.  When he found his daughter one side, whether it was Hater or Unchanged or both is never really known, launched nuclear weapons destroying all of the major cities.  Danny lost his daughter as they were trying to escape one of the blasts, when she went running back into the explosion.

    Now we come to the third book, “Them or Us.”  The world is torn apart and there are very few Unchanged left, what few there are are hunted down and slaughtered.  A small community of Haters is gathered that is ruled by a man who gained his position by killing the man in charge and putting up all the toughest fighters up in a higher social class.  So the haters now rule by might.  Danny is discovered to be able to hold in the hate and Hinchcliffe, the leader of the community, uses him to inifiltrate nests of the Unchanged so the Haters can slaughter them.  Danny becomes a sort of confidant for Hinchcliffe and learns all his secrets.  The big problem is that once all the Unchanged are gone who is left to fight, each other?  That answer seems to be yes when another community is discovered and Danny is sent to infiltrate and find out any logistical info so Hinchcliffe can attack.

    With the last of humanity struggling for survival Danny begins to question whether mankind should continue or just kill itself off.  The question of all time, do we really deserve to exist?  If so How? And what does war prove?

    This book is full of philosophic wonderings and some interesting action thrown in to keep the brain pumped.  I’ll warn you once you start reading this book or any book in the trilogy you can’t stop until the last page, even then you’ll want more.

     
  • gilwilson 10:02 PM on March 4, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: apocalypse, , , , , , ,   

    “Zombie, Ohio” by Scott Kenemore 

    “Zombie, Ohio”
    by Scott Kenemore
    Published 2011 by Skyhorse
    304 pages

    Every zombie Apocalypse movie or book talks about how people work to either escape from or destroy the zombies, but very few take you into the mind of a zombie.  Yeah I know zombies are supposed to be mindless but what if they could think.   Scott Kenemore takes that what if and explores the mind of a zombie in his latest book “Zombie, Ohio.”  Scott can pretty much be called an expert in Zombie-ology especially after looking at the books he’s written.  He’s pretty much explored all you can do with zombies with titles such as; “The Zen of Zombie: Better Living Through the Undead” (2007), “Z.E.O”, (2009),”The Art of Zombie Warfare” (2010),and “The Code of the Zombie Pirate” (2010).   This time around he explores  a Zombie Apocalypse through the mind of one certain Zombie.

    Peter Mellor regains consciousness after having an automobile accident.  He’s having trouble remembering who he is but after checking his driver’s license he finds out he’s Peter Mellor and lives near Kenton College in Ohio.  He finds his hat and begins to walk away from the accident to find his home.  When he arrives at his house he finds stacks and stacks of books and empty bottles of scotch.  He turns on the television and the only thing on TV is coverage of the Zombie Apocalypse hitting america.  Zombies attacking and eating people, the government setting up safe zones and speculation as to how this occurred.  Not remembering there was a zombie apocalypse just adds to his misery of not knowing anything.

    Soon his friend (only friend he finds out), Sam, finds Peter in the house and is surprised to see Peter.  Peter explains the accident and the memory loss.  Sam in turn explains who Peter was.  As it turns out he wasn’t a great guy.  A womanizer, a drunk and a philosphy professor at the college.   Not too bright of a future, but Peter finds out also from Sam that his life recently turned around afer he met a woman that captivated him, in fact that was where he was headed before the accident, the woman’s home which is one of those green homes where it is off the grid, possibly a great place to survive the zombie apocalypse.  Sam offers to take Peter out to the house but after he stops and sees the doctor at the college.

    Kenton College professors have stuck around defending the college from the zombies and seem to be doing a good job.   Peter and Sam arrive at one of the watch points where the doctor is assisting in keeping watch over the cemetery killing zombies as they rise from the grave.   Just as the doc is about examine Peter and check for a concussion, a zombie comes out of a grave and the shooting commences.  Peter is splattered with zombie gore and goes in to wash himself off.  In the restroom Peter removes his cap and sees his brain exposed on the top of his head.  To Peter’s horror he realizes he is a zombie and wonders what happens next.  Being a philosophy professor he begins at first to contemplate his being.  Sam comes in and Peter quickly puts the cap back on and hides his zombieness.

    Sam takes Peter to his girlfriend, Vanessa’s hide out and here Peter has to decide whether or not to expose his zombieness or to keep hiding.  When Vanessa’s neice goes missing Peter goes out to find the girl and discovers a biker that is trying to abduct the young girl, Peter attacks with all his zombie powers and eats the dead biker’s brains…and oooh they taste sooo good!  Peter jumps on a 4-wheeler and heads off to contemplate his future as a zombie.  When he returns he finds the home destroyed and a few dead bikers in the yard, with Vanessa dead he has no reason to “live” and embraces his zombiness and begins to walk and eat brains.

    Along this walk he attracts other zombies and forms a zombie army of sorts, making sure not to eat women or children (I guess even a zombie can have scruples), they soon become 400 strong and a force to be reckoned with.  The army learns of his non-zombieness because of helicopters photographing him flipping them the bird and carrying and shooting guns.  This makes him a target of interest to the military.   Peter also accidentally discovers his death was not accidental and wants to find who killed him.

    Written in first person, from Peter the Zombie’s aspect, this book gives the reader a “film noir” feel while solving the mystery and experiencing exploits.  Enjoy the gore, the killing and of course the brain eating while at the same time enjoying a mystery-love story adventure.  This book is full of fun, from the funny to the whole end of the world via zombies.  I hope Scott Kenemore will write more novels because his talent in telling a story is superb.   While this book may not be on Oprah’s list (unless she becomes undead sometime soon) it should be on any zombie lover’s list.

     
  • gilwilson 6:25 PM on August 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: apocalypse, , , , , , constitution, , national security, , , , ,   

    “Directive 51” By John Barnes 

    Podcast (to listen to review click here)


    “Directive 51”
    By John Barnes
    Read by Susan Ericksen
    Produced by Brilliance Audio
    approx 21.5 hours

    All you cyber junkies, technophiles and just anyone enjoying today’s modern comforts, enjoy them while you can, because if John Barnes new novel “Directive 51” is a glimpse into our future we could easily find ourselves flung back to times where technology doesn’t exist. “Directive 51” takes a look at an America where terrorists, both foreign and domestic all attack at once and not only are the creature comforts threatened but so is the Constitution of the United States of America.

    The year is 2024 and many factions are tired of America’s slothfulness and reliance upon technology. This time they all band together in a movement called Daybreak and bring not only America but the world to its knees. Think about this in today’s political world, there are many factions of those that want things to change in America. You’ve got the potentially violent militias, KKK, and other political factions such as; the tea party movement, Greenpeace, PETA, and many more. Now picture that on one day all these groups got together and since the big picture was to bring down the government and big business they all “attack” in their own way, all at the same time. Throw into this mix a Muslim terrorist group that has secretly infiltrated this domestic movement, all at once and our government would be scrambling, not knowing which side the enemy was hitting from. Being slightly set in the future John Barnes has created some nasty domestic weapons that these Daybreakers use. Weapons such as nanoswarm, which are tiny microscopic robots that attack electronics using the parts to reproduce the swarm and get carried along in the wind destroying cars, computers, mp3 players and anything electronic. Next we throw in a bio weapon that destroys plastics and other man made compounds reducing them to a smelly pile of mush. That would definitely put a hurt on today’s society.

    In “Directive 51” this happens along with the kidnapping of the vice president. As the plane is hunted by the military, the nanoswarm and plastic eating biotes are wreaking havoc on the system. The V.P.’s plane is found flying back in to the U.S. through the Baja Peninsula in Mexico and just as the plane is being tracked Daybreak strikes again taking out the radar systems on the west coast. The plane is loaded with a super powerful nuclear fusion bomb and headed to the final game of the World Series in Anaheim, California. Before the plane reaches it’s destination it is shot down over the California desert, killing the V.P. (if he weren’t already dead.) This devastates the President who was lifelong best friends with his V.P. and the President loses his mental faculties and resigns. This is where the governmental structure of America begins to deteriorate much like the plastics.

    In searching for the next successor the turmoil begins. The actual next successor is not a natural born citizen so, according to the Constitution cannot hold the office, the next in line is a senator that has been around since the 1970s and is a cantankerous liberal Democrat. He immediately begins promising jobs soon and not listening to the reports of food riots, violence and the deteriorating infrastructure in America, instead he rides around in a limousine and makes promises. Thanks to technology getting destroyed by Daybreak, the only form of mass communication is a newspaper set up by a woman that remembers the days of newspapers, but when she begins supporting the Republican candidate in her paper (yes it is also and election year) the acting president sends his newly formed special group of guards to arrest her and cease the operations of the newspaper.

    This book goes on with many more turnovers in the government while at the same time Americans are having to struggle and reform without the use of any technology. Just when you think the book is about to come to a peaceful “happy” ending, the author throws another wrench into the works. Such as 5 strategically placed fusion bombs which destroy Washington D.C. and the new government, and Chicago, Jerusalem, Shanghai, China and most of Europe.

    This book takes what is best about the U.S. Government and people and puts them to the test, showing that the culture can survive but it is not easy. Even through a possible civil war it is the Constitution that keeps America alive. John Barnes shows this extremely well in what can be called a thinking man’s sci-fi novel.

    The reader, Susan Ericksen, has a tough job in reading this one, but she pulls it off beautifully. I’ve listened to other audiobooks read by Ericksen and have always been amazed by her ability to create many different characters with her voice and in this book she carries on with that same talent. Each character is given their own vocal qualities and not only does it make it easy to discern who is talking or thinking but also Ericksen makes the vocal qualities match the personality.

    This novel will have you entertained, enlightened and constantly thinking about society and politics. Great combination of social commentary, political debate and sci-fi are worked into “Directive 51.”

     
  • gilwilson 3:07 AM on July 13, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: apocalypse, , , , , , , , end of times, end times, , , ,   

    “Dog Blood” A Novel by David Moody (audio book review) 

    \”Dog Blood\” podcast review“Dog Blood” A Novel
    by David Moody
    Read by Gerard Doyle
    Produced by  Blackstone Audio
    Approx 9 1/2 hours

    David Moody has created a thrilling joyride through an apocalyptic world of zombies, but without an apocalypse or zombies.  This may need some further explanation, so bear with me.  First of all this novel, “Dog Blood” is the sequel to Moody’s previous novel, “Hater.”  In “Hater” the world changed.  Many people suddenly began killing other people, it was soon discovered that a percentage of the population was changing into what was being labeled as Haters.

    The Haters would kill for no reason using only their bare hands in most cases.  The book “Hater” followed Danny McCoyne as he tried everything he could to protect his family, but near the end of the book Danny, became a Hater.  The change in him was sudden as if a switch was thrown. Once he had changed he immediately felt the urge to destroy the Unchanged.  One of the Unchanged was his father-in-law.  When his wife witnessed this she knew he had become a Hater.  As she gathered the children to make their escape Danny looked into the eyes of his 5 year old daughter and knew she was like him, but by then he was incapacitated and could do nothing.   This left the novel “Hater” with either the most thrilling ending ever or a serious hint at a sequel.

    As it turns out David Moody has written this novel, “Dog Blood” and continues the story with such a a delivery that you get tired as if YOU are the one  running around and trying to survive.  The story creates such a unique insight into the world of Haters and Unchanged, that not only do you read about the battles, the survival, the lack of governmental control but Moody writes in such a fashion you feel as if you are part of the story.  The reader, Gerard Doyle, does such a great job that he further presses that urgency and emotion that is within the story it is as if the story were written with him as the intended reader.  Doyle at times when the story calls for it can be emotionless but within a splitsecond the story telling turns to a rage fueled story and Doyle makes those shifts perfectly clear with some very artistic voicework.

    In “Dog Blood,” Danny McCoyne continues the bloody kills to destroy the Unchanged but this time he is also looking for his five year-old daughter, Ellis.  Danny makes his way back to the city from which we was taken to where his wife and daughter could be hiding/surviving.  Danny was taken to a camp where the Haters where being mass slaughtered not unlike the German concentration camps of World War II.   After escaping Danny learns of the Haters, led by a former politician, grouping to form an army to destroy the Unchanged.  The biggest obstacle in this is that as a Hater organization is hard to come by because all killing is done by instinct, not unlike a zombie horde.  This is where the zombie aspect comes in, the Haters act as vicious as any zombie from any zombie movie or story, but they can think and they don’t eat their victims, well, not always.

    Moody also takes us through the lives of the Unchanged by jumping into the story of Mark Tillotsen as he helps the military to scout for food and survivors in the area.  Mark gets extra rations for this volunteer work, which he needs because he has recently taken in a family member and his wife is pregnant.

    Survival, hordes of violent attackers, and the possible end of the world, “Dog Blood” takes up where “Hater” left off and I will warn you the ending keeps you questioning.  I will warn you also to make sure you allow extra listening time when you approach the end of the book, the last few chapters are so exciting you CANNOT stop listening.  Actually, you won’t want to stop the book at all once you start.

     
  • gilwilson 9:10 PM on May 15, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: apocalypse, , , , , , , , ,   

    “Dog Blood” A Novel by David Moody Published 2010 by Thomas Dunne Books 

    Podcast (to listen to review of audio book click here)

    “Dog Blood” A Novel
    by David Moody
    Published 2010 by Thomas Dunne Books

    In this book David Moody has created a thrilling joyride through an apocalyptic world of zombies, but without an apocalypse or zombies.  This may need some further explanation, so bear with me.  First of all this novel, “Dog Blood” is the sequel to Moody’s previous novel, “Hater.”  In “Hater” the world changed.  Many people suddenly began killing other people, it was soon discovered that a percentage of the population was changing int what was being labeled as Haters.

    The Haters would kill for no reason using only their bare hands in most cases.  The book “Hater” followed Danny McCoyne as he tried everything he could to protect his family, but near the end of the book Danny, became a Hater.  The change in him was sudden as if a switch was thrown. Once he had changed he immediately felt the urge to destroy the Unchanged.  One of the Unchanged was his father-in-law.  When his wife witnessed this she knew he had become a Hater.  As she gathered the children to make their escape Danny looked into the eyes of his 5 year old daughter and knew she was like him, but by then he was incapacitated and could do nothing.   This left the novel “Hater” with either the most thrilling ending ever or a serious hint at a sequel.

    As it turns out David Moody has written this novel, “Dog Blood” and continues the story with such a a delivery that you get tired as if YOU are running around and trying to survive.  The story creates such a unique insight into the world of Haters and Unchanged, that not only do you read about the battles, the survival, the lack of governmental control but Mood writes in such a fashion you feel as if you are part of the story.

    In “Dog Blood,” Danny McCoyne continues the bloody kills to destroy the Unchanged but this time he is also looking for his five year-old daughter, Ellis.  Danny makes his way back to the city from which we was taken to where his wife and daughter could be hiding/surviving.  Danny was taken to a camp where the Haters where being mass slaughtered not unlike the German concentration camps of World War II.   After escaping Danny learns of the Haters, led by a former politician, grouping to form an army to destroy the Unchanged.  The biggest obstacle in this is that as a Hater organization is hard to come by because all killing is done by instinct, not unlike a zombie horde.  This is where the zombie aspect comes in, the Haters act as vicious as any zombie from any zombie movie or story, but they can think and they don’t eat their victims, well, not always.

    Moody also takes us through the lives of the Unchanged by jumping into the story of Mark Tillotsen as he helps the military to scout for food and survivors in the area.  Mark gets extra rations for this volunteer work, which he needs because he has recently taken in a family member and his wife is pregnant.

    Survival, hordes of violent attackers, and the possible end of the world, “Dog Blood” takes up where “Hater” left off and I will warn you the ending keeps you questioning.  I will warn you make sure you allow extra reading time when you approach the end of the book, the last few chapters are so exciting you CANNOT put the book down.  You won’t want to put the book down at all once you start.

     
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